• Nash Peake Works,Tunstall, Stoke-on-Trent, ST6 5BT England

States of Jersey 100m High Concrete Chimney Demolition

Complete Demolition of 100m High Reinforced Concrete Chimney at Bellozanne EfW Plant, St Helier, Jersey.

 

In January 2014 Rafferty’s were awarded a contract by the States of Jersey to carry out the complete demolition of the decommissioned reinforced concrete chimney at Bellozanne EfW Plant in St Helier.

The chimney structure was constructed from reinforced concrete and stood 100m above ground level with a respective base and summit diameter of 6.57m and 5.63m.  Internally the chimney housed 3 No. brick and steel constructed flues which were supported on an array of 10 No. reinforced concrete floor slabs. Other than the bottom 20m of the concrete windshield, which was demolished using a high reach machine, the full height of the chimney was demolished in a piecemeal fashion.  This mammoth task was carried out by a select team of highly trained and experienced steeplejacks over a 22 week target schedule.

To provide safe and suitable access for the demolition, a specialised modular frame scaffold platform was installed at the summit of the chimney. This scaffold platform is designed and installed in such a way that it can be lowered as the demolition proceeds.  However, before the chimney could be reduced in height all internal components, such as the 3 No. brick/steel constructed flues and 10 No. reinforced concrete floor slabs, would need to be demolished first. This was carried out using a man riding winch complete with steel gondola for access. To view the removal and final descent of the upper most concrete floor slab please click on the video below.

States of Jersey Demolition Video Clip

With the chimney void now empty the demolition of the main concrete structure could now commence.  This procedure was carried out in a piecemeal fashion.  Rivet busters were used to break away areas of concrete to expose the steel reinforcing.  Once exposed the reinforcing steelwork was cut with flame cutting equipment, allowing a panel of concrete fold in and gravity to take effect, with the concrete panel falling to ground level within the void of the chimney.

The contract was successfully completed ahead of schedule without any safety incidents and to the full satisfaction of the client.   Mr Peter Wilkinson, Principle Engineer on the project for the States of Jersey was kind enough to write a letter of commendation following completion of the works.  To read the letter please click on the following link Letter_Rafferty 230914 reference.

We would like to personally thank Peter and all involved for their support and allowing Rafferty’s to be of service to them and the States of Jersey on this contract.

The following photographs show various stages of the demolition.

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Marston’s Grade II Listed Brick Chimney Refurbishment

Major Refurbishment of a 41m High Grade II Listed Brick Chimney

In January 2013 Rafferty Steeplejacks were awarded a major refurbishment contract on a 41m high Grade II listed industrial brick chimney for Marston’s Plc at their historic brewing site in Burton-Upon-Trent.

Our initial survey of the redundant structure in August 2012 came just in time as it revealed that the chimney was found to be in a structurally poor and deteriorated condition, in particular within the top 14m where the brickwork in areas was literally crumbling on touch. Due to the seriousness of the defects encountered, Marston’s immediately instructed Rafferty’s to install safety scaffolding within the top 16m of the chimney to prevent any loose and deteriorated brickwork from falling directly to ground level. The installation of the scaffolding had to be carried out very tentatively as not to disturb any of the deteriorated brickwork. This was completed without incident and ultimately ensured the safety of all on-site personnel.

In the meantime Rafferty’s promptly compiled a comprehensive inspection report and proposed a detailed refurbishment plan to the engineers and senior management of Marston’s. Such was their faith in Rafferty’s wealth of knowledge and experience in projects such as this, Marston’s awarded the six figure contract on single tender.

With the chimney being a grade II listed structure all plans had to be approved by the local council who commendably fully co-operated with ourselves and the client to ensure the safety of the structure.

The refurbishment plan consisted of the following;

  1. Careful plotting and detailed drawings of the existing brickwork were issued prior to deconstruction to ensure that the re-building work was carried out to identically match the original chimney construction.
  2. Careful deconstruction of the top 14m of chimney brickwork.
  3. Re-build of the top 9.147m of brickwork to identically match the original Victorian construction of the chimney before an extension was added in the 1970’s. New antique style bricks had to be manufactured for the re-build due to the poor condition of the existing brickwork.
  4. Re-pointing of the remaining 27m of chimney brickwork externally.
  5. Re-pointing of internal brickwork and replacement of loose and missing bricks where required.
  6. Repairs to retaining band steelwork.
  7. Upgrade of lightning protection system to comply with current BS EN 62305 European standard.
  8. All re-pointing and re-building works was carried out using an English Heritage approved lime mortar.

The contract was carried out over a 21 week period and was completed without any safety incidents and to the full satisfaction of the client, local council and all involved. Garry Hollins, Site Engineer and Ian Reeley, Senior Projects Manager for Marston’s made the following testimonies on completion of the works.

“The chimney looks fantastic, could you send a big thank you to your team for a job well done. I have felt for them in some of the awful weather we had at the beginning of the year and the blistering heat at the latter part.  The job has been carried out with the up most professionalism and will be more than happy to give a reference to anyone thinking of using your Company.” – Garry Hollins, Site Engineer, Marston’s Plc.

“You have completed an excellent project, carried out with great pride, determination, quality and with a very high regard to safety. Very well done.” – Ian Reeley, Senior Projects Manager, Marston’s Plc

To be given the opportunity to refurbish a structure such as the chimney at Marston’s is something which we relish as a company. This particular industrial brick chimney has stood for well over a century and is an iconic local landmark in Burton-Upon-Trent. We are delighted to have our name behind restoring and preserving the chimney for many years to come and would like to offer our gratitude to Marston’s for entrusting Rafferty’s with this project.

The following photographs show the chimney before, during and after the refurbishment works.

CONDITION OF BRICKWORK BEFORE REPAIRS

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Rafferty Steeplejacks Attract Royal Interest

The Prince’s Trust is currently undertaking a £7.5 million capital project to regenerate the Grade II listed factory at Middleport Pottery in Burslem, Stoke-On-Trent. The site, which was described as “a national treasure” by the English Heritage has been in continuous operation since 1888 and is now the last working Victorian Pottery factory in the UK.

With the Middleport Pottery site being located only a stone’s throw away from our head office Tunstall, Stoke-On-Trent, Rafferty’s were delighted to be awarded with the contract to carry out a detailed inspection survey and full refurbishment of the 30m high Grade II listed industrial brick chimney located on the site.

Our initial inspection survey of the chimney was carried out using a mobile crane and man basket to enable safe access to all elevations of the stack. Our inspection revealed that the brick chimney was found to be in a structurally unsafe condition and in need of extensive refurbishment works.

The chimney head and blocking brickwork at the termination point of the chimney was found to contain deep, open and perished mortar joints along with severe fractures, bed-lifts and loose brickwork. The remainder of the chimney shaft brickwork below was found to contain shrinkage of mortar and perished mortar joints. Finally, the retaining band steelwork was also found to be in a very poor and deteriorated condition, with sections of the steelwork found to be loose and in danger of falling to ground level.

Rafferty’s promptly compiled a comprehensive inspection report and highlighted the defects evident on the chimney. Due to the unsafe condition of the retaining band steelwork and chimney brickwork at the termination point, Rafferty’s were quickly instructed to undertake the works and make the chimney safe.

As the chimney is a Grade II listed structure the refurbishment works had to be carried out under a strict specification provided by the English Heritage and conservation architects. The chimney head and blocking brickwork had to be carefully deconstructed and re-built using the existing brickwork to exactly match its original appearance. At the request of the architects, the only alteration would be the installation of two weathering courses at the top of the chimney head which were laid on creasing tiles to create a water-shed chamfer profile. All brickwork re-pointing works had to be carried out with precision from initial preparation of the mortar joints to the application of a English Heritage approved lime mortar. The re-pointed mortar joints were slightly recessed to reveal brick arris and following the application of the repair mortar all newly pointed joints were lightly sprayed with fresh water and then wrapped in hessian which was dampened down and left in position for a period of 3 days to keep the mortar joints moist.

The quality of Rafferty’s workmanship was independently inspected by architects on a weekly basis to which we achieved complete satisfaction. A brief outline of the chimney refurbishment works is detailed as follows;

  • Installation of specialised multi lift steeplejack scaffolding within the top 12m of the chimney.
  • Man riding cradle access was also installed to enable safe access to all elevations of the chimney below the scaffold area.
  • Careful piecemeal deconstruction of the termination point chimney head and blocking brickwork.
  • Complete re-build of the chimney head and blocking brickwork to exactly match its original appearance, incorporating two weathering courses of new engineering blue brickwork.
  • Raking out and re-pointing the full height of the chimney brickwork above roof level on all elevations using English Heritage approved lime mortar all as per the consveration architects specification.
  • Replacement of steel retaining bands and corner angle irons to match the existing manufactured from stainless steel.
  • Renewal of the lightning protection system to comply with BS EN 62305.

As the head of the Princes Trust, Prince Charles is regularly kept up to date with the progress of the regeneration works at Middleport Pottery and we were told that he took particular interest in the chimney refurbishment work being carried out by Rafferty’s. We sincerely hope that Prince Charles will be pleased with the work that we have carried out on this grand old chimney structure.

The following photographs show various stages of the work from the condition of the chimney before repairs to the final completion of all refurbishment works undertaken.

BEFORE

DURING REPAIRS

AFTER

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Boddingtons Brick Chimney Demolition Manchester UK

Realty Estates Ltd – Boddingtons Site, Manchester City Centre 2010.
Demolition of 55m High Brick Chimney.

In September 2010 Rafferty’s successfully tendered for the complete demolition of the iconic 55m high Boddingtons brick chimney in Manchester city centre. To be involved in the demolition of the Boddingtons brick chimney would always be done with a slight grievance by anyone associated with the steeplejack industry, as grand chimney structures such as this are now very few and far between. However, with all nostalgic feelings aside and the demolition unavoidable, we were delighted to be awarded with this high profile task.

Due to the densely populated location of the chimney, Rafferty’s 62 years of experience within the steeplejack industry was put to the test to ensure that the chimney was demolished safely, with minimal risk and no disruption to the general public. The method chosen by Rafferty Steeplejacks was to demolish the full height of the chimney in a piecemeal fashion, depositing all demolition rubble down the inside of the stack.

To provide safe and suitable access for the demolition, a moveable band modular frame scaffold deck was installed directly below the ornamental string course brickwork at the 45m level. Tubular scaffolding was then erected to the termination point to completely envelope the top 10m of the stack. Micro netting was installed at each scaffold lift to ensure that no demolition debris would become airborne and fall to ground level externally. With all scaffolding and safety equipment in position, the demolition could commence.

The Boddingtons brick chimney had three steel liners which ran throughout the full height of the brick structure internally. Therefore, before any brickwork could be demolished, the three steel liners had to be removed first. To remove the internal liners required the use of a 200 ton mobile crane. The crane would initially take the entire weight of each liner from the termination point of the chimney. The steel liner would then be hoisted approximately 10m above the termination point where it would then be supported. Once the liner was supported it would then be cut throughout its full circumference to enable the 10m section to be safely lowered to ground level. This process would be repeated until the full height of each liner was completely removed.

Once the internal liners were dismantled then the demolition of the external brick structure could proceed. However, the original designers and builders of this grand structure would not make life easy for anyone wishing to demolish it as they decided to incorporate a 3.6m high cast iron head with a 1.5m oversail within the brick structure at the termination point. Due to the age of the chimney the cast iron head could not be removed as one section as there was a potential risk of it splitting. Therefore, it painstakingly had to be supported and dismantled in a piecemeal fashion to ensure that maximum safety prevailed throughout this contract. Once the cast iron head was removed then the chimney brickwork could be demolished. This again was done in a piecemeal fashion with all rubble being deposited down the inside of the chimney. The modular frame scaffold arrangement was lowered in conjunction with the demolition until the chimney reached a height of 20m. The final 20m of the chimney was demolished using a high reach machine, transforming the Manchester city skyline forever.

Rafferty’s 62 years of tackling high risk works at high level proved paramount on this contract, with the entire project being successfully undertaken to the complete satisfaction of the client and without any safety incidents or disruption to the general public. Our long history of successfully completing chimney projects throughout the UK and the World is why this Company has remained ‘At The Top Since 1949’.

 

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Structural Repairs to 56.1m High Steel Chimney UK

Fertiliser Plant UK 2009/2010.
Inspection and Repairs to 56.1m High S1240 Boiler Steel Chimney.

In 2009 Rafferty Steeplejacks successfully tendered for an external and internal inspection of the 56.1m high S1240 boiler steel chimney at a UK fertiliser plant. The internal inspection revealed deteriorated steelwork and holes within the top section of the chimney. As the chimney could only be shutdown for a certain amount of time, any further inspection or maintenance work had to be undertaken externally.

The S1240 steel chimney was manufactured and installed in 1975 making the chimney circa 35 years old. As steel chimney design standards have been revised and improved since original construction, along with the present condition of the chimney following our initial inspection, it was agreed that the chimney should be re-designed and a structural feasibility study should be carried out to CICIND:1999 and the new Eurocodes EN 1991 which will soon replace the present British Standard BS4076;1989 for steel chimneys. The re-design calculations and feasibility study revealed that the design life of this chimney could be substantially extended by over-plating and strengthening works being carried out to various areas of the chimney shell along with replacing the helical strake wind stabilisers at the termination point of the chimney with a modern fluid stabilising damper system to reduce excessive oscillations.

Rafferty’s offered the client a full turnkey project solution to extend the design life of this chimney and such was their faith in Rafferty’s knowledge, experience and capabilities in steel chimney construction and maintenance, the contract was awarded on single tender.

As previously stated, as the client was unable to shut the chimney down for the entire duration of the project, all works had to be approached from an external view point. As the chimney shell is concealed with mineral wool insulation and aluminium cladding externally, the cladding and insulation would need to be removed to enable any repairs to the chimney shell to be carried out.

It was decided that the first area of consideration would be the deteriorated areas of steelwork and holes that were located in the top section of the chimney. To access the full circumference of the chimney, a modular frame scaffold deck was installed directly below the upper most flange at 42.1m above ground level. Following which a multi-lift scaffold arrangement was then erected for a further 8m providing safe working platforms to all elevations of the structure within this area. Further design calculations were carried out which prevented fully scaffolding the top section of the chimney to the termination point as the scaffolding would add additional wind loadings to the already weakened structure. Therefore, the remaining top 6m of the chimney would be accessed by erecting a full circumference modular frame scaffold deck at approximately 2.5m below the termination point and from this a full circumference moveable tirfor platform was utilised to gain access below. This form of access was only installed once the multi lift scaffold arrangement was dismantled. Please see the following photographs showing the scaffold arrangement and click to enlarge.

Utilising the multi lift scaffold arrangement and moveable platform, the aluminium cladding and insulation was removed throughout the full height of the top chimney section. On removal of the cladding numerous defects were located to the chimney shell steelwork. Directly above flange level the original manufactures of this chimney installed a cladding ring throughout the full circumference of the stack. Its purpose was to support the insulation above and prevent it from slipping. As the cladding ring protrudes from the chimney shell, it is considered as an external ‘cold spot’ as it will not be consistent with the operating temperatures of the chimney shell steelwork. These external ‘cold spots’ are where accelerated corrosion and deterioration will form on steel chimney structures should weather penetration occur. Numerous ultrasonic thickness readings were therefore carried out above and below the cladding ring which revealed that the chimney shell had deteriorated far beyond its original corrosion allowance. Further deterioration and holes had also occurred around other external ‘cold spots’ within the top section of the chimney such as the access ladder securing brackets and helical strake securing bosses. Please see the following photographs which show the deterioration identified within the top section of the chimney and click on images to enlarge.

Following the inspection, the areas of the chimney shell requiring maintenance works were plotted and submitted to the client. Extensive over-plating works were then carried out to the chimney shell steelwork with the top section of the stack. Using trained steeplejack coded welders, the cladding ring was removed and the chimney shell at this location was over-plated with 8mm thick mild steel plate for a depth of 1m throughout the full circumference. Extensive patch plating was also carried out around the access ladder securing brackets and helical strake securing bosses at required locations with 8mm thick mild steel plate. Quality procedures were also implemented throughout the duration of the repair work and our workmanship was independently inspected and quality checked by a qualified company who carried out a magnetic particle inspection of the new weld seams. The results of which achieved the complete satisfaction of the client.

The extent of deterioration evident within the top section of the chimney raised serious concern with both ourselves and the client. It was therefore decided that further inspection work should be carried out to the remainder of the chimney. The original manufacturers of the stack had installed cladding rings above each connecting flange. It was agreed that the aluminium cladding and insulation should be removed above each flange level to expose the cladding ring. To remove the cladding and insulation in a safe and controlled manner required access to the full circumference of the chimney. To avoid the use of costly crane hire or extensive scaffolding works, access was achieved by using the full circumference moveable tirfor platform which was originally used within the top section of the chimney. A thorough inspection and extensive thickness tests of the chimney shell could then be carried out in these areas. The chimney shell was also exposed and inspected around each access ladder securing bracket and sample platform securing bracket. Fortunately the defects to the chimney shell were only limited to the top section of the chimney and no further maintenance works were required to the remainder of the stack. Please see the following photographs showing the moveable access platform and inspection of the chimney shell.

The final element of this project was the installation of the new fluid filled stabilising damper system. The original helical strakes were first removed and support brackets were installed to the chimney shell steelwork ready to receive the damper system. Utilising a 220 ton mobile crane the damper system was installed at the termination point of the chimney. Please see the following photographs showing the new stabilising damper being installed and finally in position.

This project was successfully completed without any safety incidents and to the complete satisfaction of the client. Our ability to provide innovative maintenance and access solutions have succeeded in prolonging the design life of this structure without any disruption to the operating conditions of the chimney.

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151m High Concrete Chimney Works UK Oil Refinery

UK Oil Refinery 2009/2010 Shutdown.
Inspection and Repairs to 151.3m High HPBH Reinforced Concrete Chimney.

History

In 1989 Rafferty Steeplejacks carried out an inspection of the 3 No. brick liners within the 151.3m high HPBH concrete chimney. The inspection revealed that the brick liners were found to be in a structurally poor and unsafe condition and a substantial demolition, engineering and construction project was therefore required. The 3 No. brick liners had to be demolished piecemeal and replaced with new steel liners throughout the full height of the chimney internally. Such was the faith in Rafferty’s construction and engineering capabilities, the client awarded the £1.65 million contract on single tender. All elements of this contract from piecemeal demolition of the original brick liners to the manufacture and installation of the new steel liners was solely carried out by Rafferty’s, offering the client a full turnkey project from start to finish.

Present Day

Rafferty’s have been involved in every major shutdown on this oil refinery since 1974. In 2009/2010 we were contracted by the client to carry out detailed inspection and maintenance works on the 3 No. steel liners within the 151.3m high HPBH concrete chimney during the 2010 planned shutdown period.

Health & Safety is always the first consideration of every contract undertaken by Rafferty’s. Careful planning and documented method statements and risk assessments were issued to cover all aspects for the safe execution of this contract. To gain safe access to within the concrete chimney windshield there are a series of internal floors and at the top floor level a series of winch arrangements were specifically designed, tested and installed within the chimney windshield. One winch was used to hoist all plant and materials and the other winch was used to hoist our operatives to the top floor level of the chimney windshield. Please see the following photographs below showing the winch lifting arrangement.

Once access was achieved, the inspection works could then begin. Within the concrete chimney windshield at the top floor level, scaffolding was erected and fully boarded out to enable the insulation and cladding to be removed from the steel liners at required locations. A thorough inspection of the liner steelwork could then be carried out. Above the roof of the concrete chimney windshield at 151.3m above ground level, the internal liners protrude for a further 3.7m. The liners above roof level were originally constructed from 316 stainless steel and are wrapped with mineral wool insulation and cladding. A thorough inspection of the liners above roof level was necessary and required the removal of the insulation and cladding throughout the full height of each liner. In order to achieve safe access to the full height and 9.1m circumference of the liners above roof level, a specialised multi lift scaffolding arrangement was specifically designed for this demanding task. Once the scaffold access was in position, the cladding and insulation was removed and a thorough inspection of the liner steelwork was carried out. At the levels inspected the liners were found to be in a poor condition with large areas of metal reduction and perforated steelwork evident. Due to time constraints the replacement of the liner sections was not possible and therefore structrual over-plating works was determined as the only viable option for a suitable repair.

The aforementioned project was successfully completed within the required shutdown period, without any safety incidents and to the complete satisfaction of the client. Please see the following photographs which detail the inspection, defects and repairs carried out the liners above roof level.

Inspection

 

 

 

 

 

 

Repairs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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120m High Concrete Chimney Works UK Oil Refinery

UK Oil Refinery 2006/2007 Shutdown.
Inspection & Repairs to 120m High Platformer 3 Concrete Chimney.

Rafferty Steeplejacks have been involved in every major shutdown on this oil refinery since 1974. The major shutdown in late 2006 and early 2007 was no different and we were awarded several chimney inspection and repair contracts during this period. The contract highlighted above was considered the largest and most demanding during this particular shutdown.

A full internal and external inspection of the 120m high platformer 3 reinforced concrete chimney was required, along with possible repair works resulting from the inspection. This work was carried out by erecting traditional steeplejack ladders on one elevation to the termination point of the chimney. At 100m above ground level a safety fan deck scaffolding was erected which ran throughout the full circumference of the chimney. Modular frame scaffolding was then erected at approximately 118m above ground level and ran throughout the full circumference of the chimney to form a working deck. Suitable scaffolding was then erected over the termination point of the chimney to enable an internal inspection of the brickwork lining on all elevations from a man riding winch and steel gondola. An all elevation external inspection of the concrete chimney shell was carried out utilising man riding cradle access. The following photographs demonstrate the scaffolding and access methods utilised for this contract (please click on images to enlarge).

Following the inspection various repair works were carried out both externally and internally.

The external repair works included the following;

1. The existing termination point castings were replaced with a new stainless steel capping arrangement which was designed and manufactured in-house – please view the following images and click to enlarge.

2. Numerous concrete and fracture repairs were carried out throughout the full height of the concrete chimney shell on all elevations.

The internal repair works included the following;

1. Brickwork fracture repairs were carried out throughout the full height of the lining using Sairset acid resistant mortar.

2. The corbelled expansion joints at the top of each brickwork lift underwent repairs and were re-packed with ceramic fibre insulation and rockwool insulation – please view the following images and click to enlarge.

The aforementioned project was successfully completed within the required shutdown period, without any safety incidents and to the complete satisfaction of the client.

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123m High Concrete Chimney Works Lithuania

AB Mazeikiu Nafta Oil Refinery – Lithuania 2005/2006.
Inspection and repair works to 123.18m High Reinforced Concrete Chimney.
Contract Value £550,000.00

In 2005 and 2006 Rafferty’s specialised steeplejack services were recruited by AB Mazeikiu Nafta on their large oil refinery in Lithuania. In 2005 Rafferty’s carried out an all elevation external inspection of the 123.18m high No. 2 concrete sulphur stack. The top 13.35m of this particular chimney had been recently re-built by others with a moler type brick which was coated with a two part resin coating externally. The detailed inspection we carried out revealed that the outer resin coating and chimney brickwork within the top 13.35m of the chimney was found to be in an extremely poor condition, with large areas of the coating becoming loose and detached from the chimney and ultimately falling to ground level.

Following our inspection of the structure, our experienced management team gave great consideration to how the upper 13.35m of this chimney could be repaired. With no shutdown of the chimney planned for the foreseeable future, it was decided that the only long term and viable option would be to install a stainless steel sheath within the top approximate 14.5m of the chimney. The stainless steel sheath was designed and manufactured in-house and shipped over to Lithuania along with all plant, equipment and materials required to carry out the work.

The site works commenced in August 2006 and a strict time schedule had to be implemented to avoid the harsh Lithuanian winters. In addition to this, the client was unable to shut the chimney down so the entire project had to be undertaken without any disruption to the operating conditions of the chimney. To enable the safe installation of the sheath a modular frame and multi-lift scaffolding arrangement was erected within the top 15m of the chimney. A man riding and materials winch arrangement was installed to enable safe access for our steeplejack operatives and to hoist the sheath sections to the termination point of the chimney. Once in position, the sheath sections were welded together by Rafferty’s coded welders and a combextra sulphur resistant type grout was poured between the stainless steel plates and the existing chimney brickwork. This process was completed until the sheath completely enveloped the top 14.5m of the chimney. Concrete repairs were also carried out to areas of the reinforced concrete chimney shell using cementitious concrete repair mortar.

The aforementioned project was successfully completed on time without any safety incidents or disruption to the operating conditions of the plant. Daily quality checks of our workmanship were also carried out by the client to which we achieved complete satisfaction. The following photogrpahs will give you some indication of the scale of this particular project. Please click on the images to enlarge.

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